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Cerebrospinal Fluid
...  third ventricle, aqueduct of Sylvius, to the fourth ventricle, foramina of the Magendie and Luschka and the subarachnoid space. To balance the normal volume, the venous sinuses in the arachnoid villi reabsorb some of CSF. Composition Normally, 500 ml of cerebrospinal fluid per day is produced. However, because of reabsorption in the arachnoid villi, you can maintain a volume of only 135 to  ...

Lymph Fluid
...  which are close-ended tubular formations that create large and intricate networks within the intercellular spaces of most of our body’s tissue. One example of this would have to be within the villi within our small intestines. It is here that the lymphactic capillaries are known as lacteals and will be used for the transportation of any products which have been generated by fat absorption  ...

Ventricles Of The Brain
...  the medial opening, the median aperture and the lateral apertures. After the process, the cerebrospinal fluid becomes waste and travels back to the circulatory system passing through the arachnoid villi.  ...

Large Intestine
...  The large intestine and the small intestine both have the same basic structural tunics, although they do have quite a few differences. The large intestine is marked by the absence of intestinal villi, and the presence of ample goblet cells that produce protective mucous in the mucosal layer. Along the large intestine, the muscularis layer has three bands referred to as taeniae coli. A lot  ...

Small Intestine
...  is specifically found in the central lower portion of the abdominal cavity, supported (in structure) by the mesentery (excluding the first segment). The small intestine wall is lined with ontestini villi, microvilli and plicae circulares. Movement of the small intestine is allowed by the mesentery, primarily due to its fan shape, but prevents twisting or kinking. The mesentery also supplies the  ...


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