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Bladder Cancer
...  urine excreted by the body on an interval is being stored inside the urinary bladder. Shaped like a little balloon, this organ is situated near the pelvis. Cancer in this part of the body does have a high survival chance as long as it is detected early. But once it has metastasized to other organs, then treating it would be a really tall order. This type of cancer has a higher occurrence rate  ...

Squamous Cell Carcinoma
...  due to injury and underlying disease. Usually, the cancer cells are confined withing the skin though they may have a tendency to spread to other body parts. The cervix, the prostate, the vagina, the urinary bladder, the lungs, the esophagus, the mouth, and the lips are just some of the common areas SCC can spread to. SCC can at times develop naturally. Causes Of Squamous Cell Carcinoma Excessive  ...

Kidneys
...  kidney and they produce almost 2 quarts of water and waste daily. The water and waste that the nephrons produce out of filtering the blood are what we call as urine. The urine is deposited to the urinary bladder, a storage sac for the urine. When the urinary bladder is halfway full, we then take it out of our body and deposit it in the comfort room. The tube where the urine slides out of the  ...

Nephron
...  convoluted tubule, the loop of henle and the distal convoluted tubule. Surrounding the renal tubules are the peritubular capillaries. Because not all of the filtered substances must reach the urinary bladder for elimination, many of the essential substances are reabsorbed back in the renal tubules through active and passive transport. Water and urea undergo passive transportation whereas  ...

Uterine Wall
...  is characterized by an outer layer of thin, visceral peritoneum. A broad ligament then runs and continues on to the uterine wall’s lateral segment. When the peritoneum passes over the urinary bladder, a shallow pouch called the vesicouterine pouch is formed. When an adjustment is made over the rectum, the pouch that is formed is called the pouch of Douglas or the rectouterine  ...


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