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Spinal Nerves
...  the information to the central nervous system for processing. Number and Nomenclature The human body has 31 spinal nerves, each corresponding to the segments in the vertebral column: 8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and one coccygeal nerve. For easier naming, anatomists use a letter and a number to represent the nerves. The letter represents the region of the vertebral column where  ...

Arteries of the Neck and Head
...  that goes into the face and neck. There are arteries that can be found on both sides of the body, and these are the right subclavian artery and the left subclavian artery. They form the internal thoracic artery, the thyrocervical trunk, the vertebral artery, and the costocervical artery. At the lateral first rib border, the subclavian artery becomes the auxiliary artery, while the subclavian  ...

Aortic Arch
...  then backward, and then to the left in front of the trachea. Afterwards, it goes backward on the left side of the trachea and finally, it passes downward on the left side of the body of the fourth thoracic vertebra. At the lower border of the thoracic vertebra, it becomes uninterrupted with the descending aorta. It then forms two curvatures. One of these curvatures curves upward, while the  ...

Brachial Nerve Plexus
...  Brachial Nerve Plexus refers to a group of nerve fibres that run from the spine. They are formed by the anterior rami of the cervical nerve through the thoracic nerve. These nerves process to the neck, the armpit region and the arm. The Brachial plexus can be divided into different elements, and these include the division, roots, cords, and the trunks. The anterior rami is responsible for  ...

Lymph Fluid
...  keep our lymph fluids flowing in the right direction. It is the job of our lymph ducts to constantly connect and then interconnect until they at last empty out into of the two main vessels. The thoracic duct is bigger than the right lymphatic duct and drains the lymph fluid which has been received in our lower extremities, the left thoracic area, the abdominal region, left upper extremity,  ...

Spinal Cord
...  flattened, it would look like an ovular cross section. If it is viewed posteriorly, the two enlargements in the spinal cord could be seen- particularly the cervical enlargement between the second thoracic vertebrate and the third cervical vertebrate. It is from that area of the spinal cord where the upper extremities get then nerve supply. The spinal cord is created by 31 segments. Each of  ...

Branches Of the Aorta Thoracic Section
...  thoracic aorta is situated inside the posterior mediastinal cavity, and has a radius that measures about 1.16 centimeters. From the thoracic cavity to the diaphragm, the aorta’s thoracic section continues the aortic arch. The blood supply maintained by aortic arch’s numerous branches is benefited by the organs and muscles situated in the thoracic region. Here are the branches of  ...

Mammary Glands
...  body is gestating, the areola darkens and enlarges. That is because the nursing child would find it easier. Blood flow to the nipples and the rest of the mammary glands is provided by the internal thoracic arterial branches. They enter the mammary glands in between he second, third and fourth intercostal margins. The spaces are found lateral to the sternum, and allows the entry of blood into  ...

Axial Muscles
...  a fan, and it is located in the pectoral girdle. Latissimus Dorsi This is a large muscle that resembles a triangle. It has a flat apperarance and it covers the inferior section of the back’s thoracic area. The latissimus dorsi is also known as the swimmer’s muscle.  ...


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