Search results

Nerves
...  or what is known as nerve impulses. These are carried out by individual neurons that make up the nerve. Nerve impulses can travel really fast at speeds of 120 m/s. The impulses travel through the synapse. There are two categorizations of nerves based on their function: sensory nerves, which convey information from receptors to the central nervous system and motor nerves, which convey  ...

Peripheral Ganglia
...  it is more prone to injury than its other counterparts. Damage to any of these masses of biological tissue is damage to the Peripheral Nervous System or PNS as well. Receptivity It responds to the synapse of neurons found at splanchnic nerves and the preganglions. The peripheral ganglia involve the inferior mesenteric ganglia, the superior mesenteric ganglia and the cilia. It responds to  ...

Cerebrum
...  the frontal lobe motor area of the brain, where these functions are planned. The upper motor neurons of the primary motor cortex transmit axons to the brain stem and the spinal cord which, in turn, synapses with the lower motor neurons. The cerebrum is also responsible for sensory processing. The cerebral cortex in the cerebrum is responsible for receiving and processing sensory information  ...

Cholinergic Stimulation
...  is present. It reacts by releasing acetylcholine from the synaptic vesicles found in the neurons. The chemical neurotransmitter is crucial for the propagation of nerve impulse. It crosses the synapse to stimulate the contraction of muscles such as the heart. Here are the things you must understand about it. The Action of Acetylcholine When a stimulus is present, the presynaptic vesicles  ...

Synapse
...  is defined as the connection bridging the presynaptic neuron, its dendrite and the axon terminal. It is one of the vital parts of the communication process in the nerve, and this is a very functional connection. The axon terminal could be known by determining the synaptic vesicles and the immense quantity of mitochondria. The synapse is located at the farthest end of the presynaptic  ...


© Copyright 2010-2014 MedicalTerms.info