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Arteries of the Shoulder
...  to the arm and the hand. Anatomy of the brachial artery The structures and compositions of brachial arteries differ from one person to another. However, as a general rule, this artery runs from the shoulder and straight to the elbow. It originates from the axillary artery, which is located on the lateral border of the body’s first rib. The brachial artery is located at the lower border  ...

Cervical Nerve Plexus
...  these special nerves, consult a doctor for proper therapy. You can also do exercises like strength exercises, flexion and stretches. Isometric exercise is one of the best strength exercises for shoulder muscles and nerves. This involves an exercise which includes contraction of the muscles and nerves. Stretches also provide relief to the injured nerves; however, remember to move slowly and  ...

Accessory Nerve
...  The spinal accessory nerve from the central nervous system provides motor innervation for two muscles of the neck. These two muscles are the trapezius muscle (responsible for the elevation of the shoulder and abduction of the scapula) and the sternocleidomastoid muscle (tilts and rotates the head). What happens when the nerve is damaged or injured? In order to test for the function of the  ...

Brachial Nerve Plexus
...  the radial nerve, the axillary nerve, the median nerve, and the musculo-coetaneous nerve. The posterior cord is the one responsible for yielding the axillary nerves which, in turn, provides the shoulder joint and skin for sensory innervations. This means that the axillary nerve is responsible for the capability of the shoulder to feel pain when exerted too much. It is also the same nerve  ...


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