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Cerebrospinal Fluid

...  the fluid. It reduces the friction in the area by serving as a cushion or buffer to prevent mechanical stress to your most vital organ. Production Cerebrospinal fluid is the product of the choroid plexus. The modified ependymal cells, blood vessels and the ventricular walls are responsible for the continuous secretion of the fluid. Once formed, it circulates from the lateral ventricles, third  ...

Cervical Nerve Plexus

...  to these body parts and what to do to safeguard the body from injury and damage. The physical body is, after all, your soul’s temple. In this article, you can learn about one of the nerve plexuses that innervate your neck, head and shoulders. What are plexuses? A plexus is a nerve junction box. It is composed of a network of smaller nerve fibers that are distributed to the different  ...

Brachial Nerve Plexus

...  Brachial Nerve plexus refers to a group of nerve fibres that run from the spine. They are formed by the anterior rami of the cervical nerve through the thoracic nerve. These nerves process to the neck, the armpit region and the arm. The Brachial plexus can be divided into different elements, and these include the division, roots, cords, and the trunks. The anterior rami is responsible for  ...

Meninges

...  cord and other parts that surround it. The pia mater also works with the arachnoid to help build one of the components of the ventricles- the roofs. It also contributes to the formation of choroid plexus, and to the attachment of dura mater to the spinal  ...

Large Intestine

...  - pouches that are stuffed with fats - are attached to the superficial portion of the epiploic appendages. The large intestine is supplied with nerves by the superior and inferior mesenteric plexus. The celiac plexus also does a little innervation. Parasympahetic innervation of the large intestines are done by pelvic splanchnic nerves and the vagus nerves. A person knows that defecation  ...

Small Intestine

...  though, the small intestine is indeed small. It is the body’s primary digestive organ, in charge of the absorption of nutrients. The small intestine is innervated by the superior mesenteric plexus. Sensory fibers reach the small intestine through the postganglionic sympathetic fibers and the preganglionic parasympathetic fibers. Blood supply to the small intestine is provided by the  ...

Tunics

...  the columnar epithelial cells. To get to the final receptacle in the body, the nutrients either use the blood vessels or the lymph ductules of the sub-mucosa. The second tunic also houses the nerve plexuses and the glands. Meissner’s plexus in the sub-mucosa provides innervation to the muscularis mucosae. The Tunic Muscularis The muscularis is the tunic that is in charge of providing  ...

Pancreas

...  next to the exocrine units. The acini produce pancreatic juice, and each acinus contains one layer of epithelial acinar cells. Innervation to the pancreas is done by the branches from the celiac plexus. The glandular functional segment of the pancreas gets the parasympathetic innervation while the blood vessels receive the sympathetic innervation. The pancreas get blood supply from the  ...

Mammary Glands

...  and allows the entry of blood into the mammary artery. The veins are found next to the arteries. When a woman is pregnant or lactating (sometimes, even when she’s not), a superificial venous plexus is evident on the surface of the mammary skin. Innervation to the breasts by way of sensory somatic neurons is supplied by the fourth, fifth and sixth thoracic nerves. The somatic neurons come  ...

Uterine Tubes

...  live. Blood supply to the uterine tubes is supplied by the uterine and ovarian arteries which are found parallel to the broad ligament. They are innervated parasympathetically by the hypo-gastric plexus and the pelvic splanchnic nerves. The nerves that connect to the tubes oversee the actions that happen between the blood vessels and the smooth muscle tissues. Venous drainage is done by the  ...