Search results

Peripheral Ganglia
...  spleen, and liver kidney along the pelvis area, which act as the target organs. The genital organs and small intestines are also involved and they respond to innervations initiated by the postganglionic neurons. The peripheral ganglia are responsible in coordinating innervations coming from other organs and cells to the central nervous system. Protection is non-existent It is easily  ...

Parasympathetic Division
...  be ready for any sympathetic action that may ensue during perceived threats or emergencies. Process It cannot function properly, though, without these essential related parts. Axons are found in preganglionic neurons to form a connection between spinal and cranial nerves, all the way to the terminal ganglia. The preganglions are cell bodies located in the oculomotor nerve, brainstem, vagus  ...

Neurolgia
...  is obtained from one of the primary cell layers responsible for creating the neurons- the ectoderm. It has six categories: oligodendrocytes, neurolemmocytes, microglia, ependymal, astrocytes and ganglionic gliocytes. Take a look at the characteristics of each. Neurolemmocytes - It makes up the myelin layers, the ones surrounding the axon cells in the peripheral nervous system.  ...

Small Intestine
...  primary digestive organ, in charge of the absorption of nutrients. The small intestine is innervated by the superior mesenteric plexus. Sensory fibers reach the small intestine through the postganglionic sympathetic fibers and the preganglionic parasympathetic fibers. Blood supply to the small intestine is provided by the celiac trunk and the inferior mesenteric artery, helped along by a  ...

Tunics
...  the layers of the muscularis is the myenteric plexus. This is where the most necessary nerve pathway in the gastrointestinal tract is conducted. Nerve fibers and the autonomic nervous system’s ganglion in the myenteric plexus supply sympathetic and parasympathetic innervaion to the gastrointestinal tract. The Serosa As the outermost tunic, the serosa is the gastrointestinal tract’s  ...

Pineal Gland
...  cells. It gets innervated by the autonomic nervous system, and only that. Even if the pineal gland is located in the brain, it does not receive innervation from the brain. The superior cervical ganglion of the autonomic nervous system is specifically in charge of this innervation. The pineal gland exists in most mammals, and its function is explicitly recognized in some organisms. But, that  ...

Thyroid Gland
...  cells that are found in between follicles. These cells are known as parafollicular cells, and they secrete calcitonin and thyrocalcitonin. Innervation to the thyroid gland comes from the postganglionic neurons from the superior and middle cervical ganglia. Additional innervation is supplied by the second to the seventh segment of the spinal cord with their preganglionic neurons. The  ...


© Copyright 2010-2014 MedicalTerms.info