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Tetanus
...  could not be completely cured. Normally, tetanus could be acquired when a person has a wound infected by the bacteria. Symptoms Tetanus could be first seen when a person experiences stiffness or contraction of the muscles in the jaw or in other areas, fever, difficulty in breathing, and worse, stopping of the heartbeat. Being infected with tetanus causes the body to produce a certain toxin  ...

Dysmenorrhea
...  Treatment Most women use NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) like ibuprofen, naproxen, and mefanamic acid to relieve the pain by controlling the production of prostaglandins and reducing contraction in the uterus. These are taken about two days before menses begins and up to two days after the cycle ends. However, these can gave side effects such as nausea, peptic ulcer, dyspepsia,  ...

Cervicitis
...  The most common medical treatment for STDs is through administering antibiotics prescribed by a physician or gynaecologist. Cervicitis Prevention Cervicitis is best prevented through avoiding the contraction of sexually transmitted diseases. Women can protect themselves from cervicitis and other more serious STDs like HIV and AIDS by using protection during sexual intercourse. The risk of  ...

Skeletal Muscles
...  The alternating dark and light bands in the fibers are responsible for the striations. The main proteins that make up the fibers are the actin and the myosin. When the two bind together, muscle contraction commences. Control of Movement Unlike the other two types of muscles where they contract even without thinking of it, the skeletal muscle is voluntarily-controlled. In medical terms, the  ...

Parasympathetic Division
...  from the neurotransmitters. These receptors in the effector organs combine with the neurotransmitters. The combination will trigger biochemical or physiological reactions, like muscle contraction and relaxation, increased secretion of hormones in endocrine glands, release of these hormones, and similar activities. Specific receptors of toxic substances like nicotine and muscarine  ...

Smooth Muscle
...  are attached to the bones, the smooth muscles are found in the walls of hollow organs, glands and arteries or veins. Autorhythmicity of the Smooth Muscle This involves its periodic spontaneous contraction resulting from the fluctuation of the depolarization and repolarization of the smooth muscles’ action potential. Depolarization is the process wherein a reduction occurs between the  ...

Cholinergic Stimulation
...  by releasing acetylcholine from the synaptic vesicles found in the neurons. The chemical neurotransmitter is crucial for the propagation of nerve impulse. It crosses the synapse to stimulate the contraction of muscles such as the heart. Here are the things you must understand about it. The Action of Acetylcholine When a stimulus is present, the presynaptic vesicles release the chemical in  ...

Cervical Nerve Plexus
...  also do exercises like strength exercises, flexion and stretches. Isometric exercise is one of the best strength exercises for shoulder muscles and nerves. This involves an exercise which includes contraction of the muscles and nerves. Stretches also provide relief to the injured nerves; however, remember to move slowly and breathe deeply so as not to overstretch the injured part. Whatever you  ...

Blood Vessels
...  as: The arteries are significant for measuring vital health statistics such as pulse rate and blood pressure. The former is measured through touching an artery as it keeps pace with the rhythmic contraction of the heart. The latter is done through once again touching the artery for the blood has higher pressure in it than through the veins. Capillaries ensure that the blood cells going to  ...

Conduction System of the Heart
...  to the right part of the left bundle branches and extend further to the right and left sides of the apex and the interventricular septum of the heart. The heart’s cardiac cycle refers to the contraction and relaxation of the myocardium in the walls of the heart chambers. This process is done by the heart’s conduction system during the time it takes to make one heartbeat. The two  ...


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