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Basal Nuclei
...  in the midbrain. Both of these types should exist in congruence with each other so that proper coordination or movements would occur. Anatomy The basal nuclei are connected to the thalamus, the cerebral cortex and to each other through intricate neural circuits. These feedback loops can be either inhibitory or stimulatory, depending on the needs of the body. As indicated by the terminology  ...

Cerebrum
...  the cerebrum to the thalamus to other regions of the brain. The cerebrum is actually responsible for all the complex behaviours in human beings. The cerebrum is composed of three sub-regions; the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and the limbic system. The functions of the cerebrum are outlined in detail below: The cerebrum is primarily responsible for the volitional motor functions of the body.  ...

Cerebellum
...  other parts have large, wavy irregular lines and the cerebellum has fine parallel grooves that are evenly spaced. Because of the location of the cerebellum, it is more protected than the rest of the cerebral cortex. For years, people thought that the cerebellum was useful only in the motor skills that we acquire through our lives; but today, it is being re-evaluated. The cerebellum is now  ...

Spinal Cord
...  makes up the anterior corticospinal tracts. The remaining nerve tracts are called the extrapyramidial tracts. These originate in the brain stems. A variety of synaptic connections cause the cerebral cortex, the cerebellum, and the basic nuclei to produce motion indirectly.  ...


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