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Liver
...  through the hepatic hepatic sinusoids. Spaces between the plates are formed by these sinusoids. Due to the presence of phagocytic Kupffer cells that line sinusoids, they are more permeable than the capillaries that are found in the body. The structure of the plates together with the combination of permeation of sinusoids makes sure that every hepatocyte in the liver comes in contact with the  ...

Alveoli
...  simple squamous epithelial tissue to allow the diffusion of gas to occur. It contains collagen and elastic fibers to accommodate the constant stretching of the organ. Because of the large amount of capillaries, oxygen easily diffuses in the blood and the carbon dioxide is expelled. Cells The alveoli have three types of cells. They are the Type I cells, Type II cells and the macrophages. The  ...

Nephron
...  function. Renal Corpuscle Filtration The renal corpuscle is the primary area of blood filtration. It consists of the glomerulus and the bowman’s capsule. The glomerulus is the ball of coiled capillaries that receives blood from the afferent arteriole and brings back the blood cells to the circulation through the efferent arteriole. While passing through the glomerulus, some of the low  ...

Gall Bladder
...  cm thick with three visible coats, an internal mucous and muscular coat, the middle connective tissue layer, and the outermost serous membrane. All over the tissue slides, you can see a network of capillaries to supply the cells inside. Special stains like the carmine or picro-carmine solutions will make all the structures more visible. Function The main function of the gall bladder is to  ...

Blood Vessels
...  all the regions in the body to have fresh supply of blood. Prior to being branched into body regions, the arteries actually deliver oxygen-rich blood to the second type of blood vessels called the capillaries. The capillaries actually serve as the connectors for arteries and veins. They are very thin and fragile – with each one being equivalent to the size of one epithelial cell, about a  ...

Lymph Fluid
...  lymphatic capillaries are the ones that create the beginning of what is known as the lymphatic system. It is these lymphatic capillaries which are close-ended tubular formations that create large and intricate networks within the intercellular spaces of most of our body’s tissue. One example of this would have to be within the villi within our small intestines. It is here that  ...

Routes Of Circulation
...  then back to the heart. The heart’s right ventricle is also included, and it is to expel the blood, so is the pulmonary trunk, pulmonary valve and the pulmonary arteries. It is the pulmonary capillaries that is responsible for the waste gas exchange. The blood which is oxygenated will then be transported back to the heart through the pulmonary veins. The body’s circulatory system,  ...

Small Intestine
...  cells that produce protective mucous. Every intestine’s core is made up of connective tissue. It is formed by lamina propria and it contains a great amount of lacteal (lymphatic vessels) blood capillaries and lymphocytes. Lacteal supply nutrient-absorption for fatty acids and cholesterol, and helps the blood vessels take in the amino acids and monosaccharides. Microvilli is considered as  ...

Pituitary Hormones
...  inhibiting or stimulating hormones from the hypothalamus pass by way of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal portal to get to the anterior pituitary. They all enter the median eminence through the primary capillaries network. The anterior pituitary’s secondary capillaries get the venous drainage that comes from the pituitary stalk. Those two types of capillaries network serves as a passage for  ...


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