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Lungs
...  that damage the ability of the lungs to exchange carbon dioxide for oxygen. Some of the most common health conditions that make it hard to breathe are: Asthma, Bronchitis, Emphysema, Apnea and PneumoThorax. The most common health conditions that minimize and prevent gas exchange are: Pulmonary Edema, carbon monoxide poisoning and smoke inhalation. The peak of your lung function is in the late  ...

Alveoli
...  released by the Type II cells reduce the surface tension of water. They consist of phospholipids and protein mixture. They are important in the pulmonary compliance, the ability of the lungs and the Thorax to expand and to keep the alveolar stability. Without the surfactants, the alveoli will collapse at the end of the expiration. In cases of premature delivery, the amount of surfactant produced  ...

Peripheral Ganglia
...  system to the different parts of the body. The peripheral ganglia are found near target organs in the upper area of the body, more specifically, in the head. You can also find them in the abdomen, Thorax, stomach, spleen, and liver kidney along the pelvis area, which act as the target organs. The genital organs and small intestines are also involved and they respond to innervations initiated  ...

Parasympathetic Division
...  located in the oculomotor nerve, brainstem, vagus nerve, facial nerve, glossopharyngeal nerve, and in the spinal cord. The terminal ganglia are found in the walls of the target organs at the pelvis, Thorax and abdomen or in the head. Preganglionic neurons are produced in the spinal column and the brain. Majority of the neurons in the parasympathetic division originate from the midbrain, the  ...

Spinal Cord
...  allowing coordination. The tracts of white matter that are situated peripherally are the ones that send a variety of impulses to and fro the brain. The length of the spinal cord is similar to the Thorax and is connected to the brain through the foramen magnum of the skull. It has two basic, yet very vital functions: It is responsible for the impulses that result in neural communication to and  ...

Branches Of the Aorta Thoracic Section
...  arteries. Lungs - it is the bronchial arteries which gives the lungs the blood that it need. Esophagus - esophageal arteries provide the blood supply it needs which passes through mediastinum. Thorax wall and intercostal arteries - it is the segmental posterior intercostal arteries that provide blood supply to the Thorax wall and the intercostal muscles. Diaphragm- the one meeting the  ...

Principle Arteries
...  artery, being the primary artery, creates branches of the other arteries in the human body. The aorta is located at the left ventricle which is arched above the heart, descending through the Thorax, then in the abdomen. The branches breaking from the aortic artery delivers the oxygen-rich blood all throughout the human body. By the time the left ventricle contracts, the blood would be  ...

Thorax Veins
...  is the superior vena cava that accepts blood from brachiocephalic veins, and the azygos system occurring in the veins. This so called azygos vein running with respect to the Thorax, specifically in its superior wall and also in the abdomen. It will also pass through the vertebral column’s right side and then through the mediastinum it rises. Attached with the azygos system is the  ...


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