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Parkinsons Disease
...  disease is a type of motor system disorder or degenerative disorder of The central nervous system that involves the impairment of the person’s speech, motor skills and several other important functions. There are four major symptoms of this condition; and this includes: trembling of the arms, hands, legs, jaw, and the face; tremor; slowness of movement; and postural instability  ...

Tetanus
...  having it. How To Treat Tetanus An antitoxin meant for tetanus could be given to the patient for the treatment. This would be very effective if diagnosed early, and if the toxins has not reached The central nervous system yet. Otherwise, the disease could really cause death to a patient. Sadly, in most cases, toxins have already reached the CNS by the time it is diagnosed by the doctor.  ...

Nerves
...  called epineurium. There are three categorizations for nerves: Afferent nerves, efferent nerves and mixed nerves. Afferent Nerves main purpose is to conduct signals from the sensory neurons to The central nervous system while Efferent Nerves essentially conducts signals from the central nervous system. Mixed Nerves are a combination of these two; they conduct both incoming and outgoing  ...

Spinal Nerves
...  nervous system is the primary control system in the body. It is divided into The central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. The spinal nerves are parts of the peripheral nervous system. They receive inputs from the different sensory organs in the body and deliver the information to The central nervous system for processing. Number and Nomenclature The human body has 31 spinal  ...

Peripheral Ganglia
...  ganglia are a group of cells found in the Peripheral Nervous System or PNS. The PNS is found in the periphery of The central nervous system or CNS. This exists outside the spinal cord and the brain and is not enclosed with any protective structure. The peripheral ganglia have the following characteristics: Major Function The major function of the peripheral ganglia is to connect the  ...

Axon
...  extending from the neuron. Without the axon, the neurons will not be able to perform their physiologic functions. These axons come in two types; the axons that render action potentials towards The central nervous system or CNS, and those that conduct them away from the central nervous system. These are some significant parts related to the axon Related parts The axon hillock is where the  ...

Neurotransmitters
...  the brain. This acts in an inhibitory manner in the spinal cord and enters the neuron, resulting to Inhibitory Postsynaptic Potential or IPSP. Endorphins You can find these neurotransmitters in both The central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. It is also known as the endogenous morphine because it has almost the same effect as morphine. Morphine acts as an anesthetic agent and  ...

Visceral Effector Organs
...  the stimulus and sends it to the sensory neuron. The interneurons, on the other hand, lie between two neurons and communicate with them. What is a reflex arc? The reflex arc is the simplest way for The central nervous system to receive and react to a stimulus. When a stimulus is applied, it is conducted to the central nervous system. This will allow the muscle to contract and bring the  ...

Abducens Nerve
...  nervous system is divided into two parts: The central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. The peripheral nervous system is further subdivided into the autonomic nervous system and the sensory-somatic nervous system. The sensory-somatic system consists of 12 pairs of cranial nerves and 31 pairs of spinal nerves. The sixth pair among these 12 pairs is the abducens nerves. Anatomy  ...

Accessory Nerve
...  The cranial part serves the same function as the vagal nerve fibers; thus, we often consider it as a component of the vagus nerve instead of the accessory nerve. The spinal accessory nerve from The central nervous system provides motor innervation for two muscles of the neck. These two muscles are the trapezius muscle (responsible for the elevation of the shoulder and abduction of the  ...


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