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Acomplia
...  in the brain and the body’s peripheral organs. These receptors are important in metabolizing fat and glucose, and it controls a person’s appetite and cravings through his or her hypoThalamus. The hypoThalamus is also responsible for controlling a person’s caloric intake and regulating an individual’s energy balance. By blocking CB1 receptors and controlling your  ...

Cabaser
...  interrupting prolactin production’s functional output. Cabaser is deemed more effective than its counterpart, Bromocriptine, because it directly touches on the dopamine receptors of the hypoThalamus. That impedes the sending of signals to the pituitary gland, which releases prolactin. So, excessive prolactin production is going to be dealt with better with Cabaser. People who are  ...

Cushing’s Disease
...  If your body’s cortisol production levels are at normal rates, you would become less susceptible to the development of Cushing’s disease. However, if the regulating switches of your hypoThalamus and pituitary glands start showing signs of dysfunction, your cortisol levels would also increase and make you more susceptible to Cushing’s syndrome. Its symptoms and signs Common  ...

Amenorrhea
...  Amenorrhea Causes The causes of amenorrhea can vary from simple lifestyle factors to more serious medical conditions. Primary amenorrhea may be a symptom of pituitary disease, a problem in the hypoThalamus, missing reproductive organs, hormonal imbalance, or structural abnormalities in the reproductive system. On the other hand, secondary amenorrhea may be caused by contraceptives, breast  ...

Glandular Structure
...  the endocrine pours the secretion directly to the blood stream. They are the ductless glands that affect the body at large. Some of the important organs are the pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, hypoThalamus, ovaries, testes, pancreas, and thymus. All these organs have their specific target organs. Overgrowth Overgrowth of cells can also occur in the glandular structure. If it happens, it can  ...

Adrenal Gland
...  producing epinephrine and norepinephrine, as well as the hormones related with stress through the process of corticosteroids. One of the main functions of the adrenal gland is to work with the hypoThalamus and the pituitary gland. The hypoThalamus produces corticotrophin-releasing hormones that stimulate the pituitary gland and, in turn, the pituitary gland produces corticotrophin hormones  ...

Hypothalamus
...  you aware that you experience sensations because of a small portion of your brain called the hypoThalamus? The hypoThalamus recognizes the different stimuli coming from the various parts of the body. Only when the hypoThalamus recognizes them do we feel sexual pleasure, rage, fear, and other emotions. This is why when we are unconscious, we fail to feel any of these sensations. Hormones  ...

Basal Nuclei
...  latter is found in the midbrain. Both of these types should exist in congruence with each other so that proper coordination or movements would occur. Anatomy The basal nuclei are connected to the Thalamus, the cerebral cortex and to each other through intricate neural circuits. These feedback loops can be either inhibitory or stimulatory, depending on the needs of the body. As indicated by  ...

Cerebrum
...  areas. The olfactory, limbic and motor systems send fibres from the cerebrum to the spinal cord and brainstem; the volitive and cognitive systems, in turn, sends fibres from the cerebrum to the Thalamus to other regions of the brain. The cerebrum is actually responsible for all the complex behaviours in human beings. The cerebrum is composed of three sub-regions; the cerebral cortex, basal  ...

Diencephalon
...  when it is defective. This part is in the core center of the brain, above the brainstem. The complexity of the structure associates well with its functions. Here are the parts of this tiny tissue. Thalamus The Thalamus comprises the upper and majority parts of the diencephalon. It occupies 80% of its total mass. The Thalamus is divided into two lobes. Several nuclei make up each of the lobes  ...


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