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High Blood Pressure
...  in the case of high blood pressure. The causes for the high blood pressure vary greatly amongst different patients and are accumulative. High blood pressure can be a result of coarctation of the Aorta, renal artery stenosis, arteriosclerosis, recreational drug use, alcohol toxicity, renal disease, diabetes, pain, stress, anxiety, obesity, cold medications, and appetite suppressants, chronic  ...

Heart
...  it to the lungs. The function of the left side of the heart (a ventricle and an atrium) is to receive the blood with high oxygen concentration and forwarding it to the rest of the body. The Aorta runs down from the left ventricle, it directs the newly oxygenated blood to the entire body. There is a valve known as the aortic valve at the bottom of the Aorta, it shuts off the blood flow  ...

Aortic Arch
...  carry blood away from the heart. The body’s tissues depend on the largest artery of the body (the Aorta). The Aorta carries and distributes oxygenated blood to the tissues of the body for nutrition. Anatomists describe the Aorta in several portions; namely, the ascending Aorta, the arch of the Aorta and the descending Aorta. What is the description and location of the aortic  ...

Blood Supply to the Brain
...  circle, to exist. This area may be treated like a pool party of the vessels that supply blood to the brain. This is where the common carotid arteries (branches from the left ventricle of the heart Aorta) split off into smaller internal carotid arteries. These arteries are responsible for creating a network of vessels to be scattered along the inferior surface of the brain. The new sections  ...

Blood Vessels
...  the pressure of pumping blood. The smooth layer is such so that the path of the blood would have no obstacles whatsoever.The main artery used by the heart to pump out blood is called the dorsal Aorta. This divides into smaller arteries, which enable each of all the regions in the body to have fresh supply of blood. Prior to being branched into body regions, the arteries actually deliver  ...

Arteries of the Pelvis
...  Aorta, which is the largest artery in the body, originates from the left ventricle of the heart and extends to the abdomen, where it is divided into the right and left common iliac arteries. Each vessel passes down to their corresponding sides and traverses about 5 centimeters before turning into the internal and external iliac arteries. The organs as well as the gluteal muscles located in  ...

Abdominal Aorta
...  there are many blood vessels that can be found in the abdominal cavity, the abdominal Aorta is the largest and most important artery that can be found in this part of the human anatomy. It is directly connected to the descending Aorta and is considered as part of the Aorta. This is a key component of the human circulatory system, and observing how it works can lead to a deeper understanding  ...

Fetal Circulation
...  foramen directly into the left atrium from the right atrium; thus, bypassing pulmonary circulation. From here, the blood flows into the left ventricle. The left ventricle pumps blood through the Aorta into the body. Some of the blood moves from the Aorta through the internal iliac arteries to the umbilical arteries, and re-enters the placenta. Another mechanism different in fetal  ...

Branches Of the Aorta Thoracic Section
...  thoracic Aorta is situated inside the posterior mediastinal cavity, and has a radius that measures about 1.16 centimeters. From the thoracic cavity to the diaphragm, the Aorta’s thoracic section continues the aortic arch. The blood supply maintained by aortic arch’s numerous branches is benefited by the organs and muscles situated in the thoracic region. Here are the branches of  ...

Branches Of The Aorta Abdominal Region
...  Aorta abdominal region is located between the diaphragm and the fourth lumbar vertebrate. This region is separated into left and right common iliac arteries. Composing the first branch of the Aorta abdominal region are the inferior phrenic arteries, then the celiac trunk. The celiac trunk is solitary and is composed of three arteries namely: splenic artery, left gastric artery and the common  ...


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